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Top 17 Strongest Dog In The World

  • Animal
Strongest Dog In The World

When you think of a strong dog, what breed comes to mind? If your answer was “Lab” or “Golden,” then congrats! You’re probably one of many Lab and Golden owners who know how much these two breeds love strength. But there’s far more than just Labs and Goldens that can lay claim as being among the most powerful animals on Earth.

Dogs have always been part of human culture and history — so much so that they’ve become an integral part of our daily lives. People who own dogs often consider them to be family members and friends. And just like humans, dogs have their own unique personalities. Some are gentle souls, while others prefer a good ruff or two. Still other breeds can even rival some wild animals for strength and ferocity.

Here are some other top contenders for this title…

1. Tibetan Mastiff

Tibetan Mastiff
Tibetan Mastiff

The Tibetan Mastiff is not so much an actual breed but rather a cross between several different ones (including Great Danes). The result is a massive, sweet-tempered beast with a gentle disposition. This giant canine has earned its reputation as one of the world’s toughest beasts over time thanks to its ability to withstand extreme cold temperatures while hunting down prey.

A full grown male will tip the scales at around 200 pounds, which means it takes up plenty of room inside your house. It also needs lots of exercise, especially when they get older because their size makes them prone to overheating if kept indoors too long. However, despite all this, they make excellent watchdogs and protective pets.

2. Boxer

Boxer Dog
Boxer Dog

Boxers were originally bred to fight each other through bare knuckle boxing matches. Today, however, boxers have become popular family dogs due to their friendly dispositions and even temperament. They tend to be calm and laid back unless provoked and don’t require excessive amounts of space like larger dogs do.

Boxers are good with children and thrive best in homes where they receive consistent positive reinforcement from owners. These pups typically weigh about 90 pounds and stand at least 24 inches tall.

3. Labrador Retriever

Labrador Retriever
Labrador Retriever

If you’ve ever seen a lab puppy play fetch in the park, you’ll understand why people fall head over heels in love with this pooch. While Labs might seem reserved by nature, they take pleasure in playing and running outside whenever possible — and sometimes even doing both together.

Like golden retrievers, labs enjoy retrieving anything dropped off by humans. There aren’t any strict grooming requirements for labs since they shed less hair. They need regular brushing though, and should never be left alone for extended periods of time without human supervision. Labs are affectionate and loyal towards their families, making them great companions.

Their playful natures coupled with their willingness to help out around the home makes them very popular with pet parents. On average, labs weigh between 58 and 75 pounds, stand about 22 inches high, and come in varying colors including black, yellow and white.

4. Weimaraner

Weimaraner
Weimaraner

This graceful yet muscular breed originated in Germany . With their large heads, broad chests, and elongated necks, weimaraners look nothing short of regal. As such, they easily command attention wherever they go.

In addition to having a naturally noble appearance, weimaraners possess athletic bodies capable of enduring rigorous training exercises. Due to their athleticism, weimaraners tend to fare well in sports events. For instance, they excel at agility competitions and show jumping. At rest, weimaraners appear relaxed but ready to take action at a moment’s notice. However, weimaraners may grow aggressive towards strangers due to their natural guarding instincts. Since they have been known to attack small animals, particularly birds, weimaraners should ideally live with cats.

5. Australian Cattle Dog

Australian Cattle Dog

While cattle herding has existed in Australia since prehistoric times, the modern version didn’t develop until the early 1900s. Originally, farmers needed assistance controlling their herds, so they created a canine that could work alongside them. Unlike other types of herding dogs, the Australian cattle dog is able to hold onto its master’s scent. As a result, it’s perfect for guiding groups of calves, sheep, horses and other livestock. Because these dogs were initially intended for work, they are generally larger than other types of domestic dogs.

A lot of factors go into determining whether a particular animal is the strongest in the world. One thing that must be taken into account is how much weight the animal carries. For example, how heavy is a fully grown tiger? What about a lioness carrying cubs? You might think lions wouldn’t compare well because they carry a hefty load. But let’s say a male lion had four full-grown offspring. That would put him right behind the males of certain hyenas, which typically have six pups per litter. When weighed against each other, tigers, lions, and other predators really start to stack up!

6. Rottweiler

Rottweiler
Rottweiler

Like Dalmatians, rotties share similar physical characteristics. Rottweilers are big boned and stocky, giving them a sturdy build. Because of their heaviness, they are better suited for jobs requiring brute force like construction work and heavy lifting. Despite this fact, rotties are surprisingly agile and fast runners.

When outdoors, they prefer open terrain that allows them to run freely. Like Dalmatians, rotties tend to bark a lot. Unlike Dalmatians, however, their barking isn’t annoying to neighbors. Rather, they use barks to communicate with others. Some argue that this trait stems from centuries ago when rotties used to guard livestock against thieves. Though no longer needed today, rotties remain vigilant protectors of property.

Overall, rottweilers are devoted, loving animals. They are patient, kindhearted and forgiving toward their masters. They are also active in helping care for their young and elderly members. Of course, they don’t hesitate to defend those they love either. Keep in mind that rottweilers must be trained properly before attempting tasks that could put their lives at risk. Otherwise, they could end up hurting someone unintentionally.

7. Doberman Pinscher

Doberman Pinscher
Doberman Pinscher

These fearless dogs originated in Germany during the late 18th century. Although commonly referred to as “guard dogs,” Dobermans are actually useful working dogs. Most notably, Dobermans are skilled at finding missing persons and apprehending criminals.

They are also adept at protecting their owners and keeping intruders out of certain areas. Unlike smaller dogs like terriers, Dobermans display aggressiveness and dominance towards other animals and people alike. Fortunately, they have soft bellies and won’t hurt a fly. Dobermans also possess sharp teeth, allowing them to chase after vermin and rodents. Dobermans are relatively easy to train.

They respond well to firm commands and learn quickly. Owners shouldn’t let them roam loose, however, lest they inadvertently hurt someone else’s animal or child. Although they carry the same name as Adolf Hitler, Dobermans don’t necessarily reflect his views. Many believe that the Nazis abused Dobermen and other animals during wartime atrocities. Nevertheless, history shows us otherwise.

8. German Shepherd Dog

German Shepherd Dog
German Shepherd Dog

Famous for possessing keen senses of hearing and sight, German shepherds remained popular amongst farmers due to their herding abilities. By the 1930s, however, they had fallen out of favor due to their inability to adapt to modern life.

Thankfully, interest in this breed revived in the 1950s following numerous improvements made to their overall demeanor. Today, German Shepherds continue to perform invaluable roles throughout society, serving as search and rescue dogs, police officers’ K-9 partners, bomb sniffers, guide dogs, therapy animals, and military service dogs. They are also frequently chosen to participate in sporting events and parades. German shepherds typically weigh approximately 70 – 95 lbs., stand about 26 – 30 inches tall, and come in various coat patterns.

9. English Springer Spaniel

English Springer Spaniel
English Springer Spaniel

Although technically classified as toy spaniels instead of spaniels proper, springer Spaniels are quite tough. Originating in Spain, this breed was developed specifically for hunting rabbits. During hunts, springers would swim across rivers carrying hunters on their backs.

After countless generations, springers began showing intelligence early on. Nowadays, they primarily assist humans in performing outdoor activities like camping, hiking, fishing, gardening, farming, hunting, etc. They are ideal companion animals for families living near rural landscapes.

Also called water spaniels, springers spend much of their day swimming and therefore lack stamina compared to land mammals. Therefore, they should only be taken on walks once every few days. Other than walking, springers don’t require daily exercise. They are perfectly content lounging under blankets, watching TV, or simply sleeping.

Springers make wonderful lap dogs and are perfect additions to households that already own another type of dog. On average, springers weigh anywhere from 35 — 60lbs, stand roughly 14 — 21 inches tall, and come in a variety of color combinations.

10. Great Dane

Great Dane
Great Dane

The Great Dane is one of the largest working dogs on earth, standing at around 20 inches tall and weighing up to 200 pounds. The breed was originally bred as both a companion and farm animal, but today it’s mostly used as a showpiece.

This giant canine doesn’t need much room to move about and will happily make use of its surroundings no matter what they happen to be. Although they’re relatively quiet, these powerful giants love nothing more than to run through fields or chase after balls. They were once thought to have descended from wolves, but now researchers believe they may actually descend from ancient mastiff-like dogs.

11. Bernese

Bernese
Bernese

The bernese mountain dog ranks high among the most fearless dogs in the world. These massive creatures stand around 22 inches tall and weigh between 80 and 150 pounds. Their fur ranges from white to black with brown patches. Despite their size and strength, bernese mountains tend to be loners.

Most people won’t see this noble steed until it’s too late, as they sometimes attack strangers without any provocation. But even then, if you’re lucky enough to pull out your wallet before the bite begins, don’t worry — you’ll still get your money back!

12. Newfoundland Dog

Newfoundland Dog
Newfoundland Dog

These furry wonders usually live outdoors where they hunt, fish and herd sheep. Newfoundlands have a very strong sense of smell and can identify scents from several miles away. If someone comes within range, its large head turns into a battering ram capable of knocking down walls.

This big guy is also known for his protective nature and willingness to fight off would-be attackers. A single Newfoundland can kill a full-grown wolf. However, new owners should note that these gentle giants aren’t exactly suited for living indoors.

13. Akita Inu

Akita Inu
Akita Inu

This long-haired breed isn’t considered particularly strong by itself, but when combined with training and a strong leader, it can produce amazing results. Its thick coat helps protect it from cold weather, making it ideal for colder climates such as Japan, Siberia and Alaska. It has a reputation for being stubborn and willful, which makes training a challenge. Like many other Japanese hunting dogs, akitas were first bred to find prey such as boar, bear and deer. Today, they are primarily kept as watchdogs, sporting short hair and a muscular build.

14. Stabyhoun

Stabyhoun
Stabyhoun

The stabyhoun (also called the bloodhound) is another type of border collie. It was developed specifically for tracking game animals, including rabbits and squirrels. Because of its small stature and sharp eyesight, the stabyhoun has earned the nickname “the little hunter.” These dogs are extremely loyal and intelligent, but they do require lots of exercise and stimulation to keep them happy.

15. Afghan Hound

Afghan Hound
Afghan Hound

Like many other native Afghans, the Afghan hound came about naturally due to the harsh conditions found there. For thousands of years, these dogs have helped herd camels and goats across the rugged terrain. At home, they help guard their families against intruders. These agile dogs are excellent hunters but are not suitable pets for those looking for something to cuddle with during the day.

16. Irish Wolfhound

Irish Wolfhound
Irish Wolfhound

Although it stands only about 6 feet tall and weighs less than 50 pounds, this animal packs quite a punch. Even though it doesn’t look especially tough, the Irish wolfhound has great stamina and endurance that allow it to pursue a target for hours on end. With its dark gray color and shaggy coat, this creature looks more like a wolf than a dog. Although it does bark loudly, the wolfhound prefers silence, which means it needs plenty of space to roam around freely.

17. Papillon Dog

Papillon Dog
Papillon Dog

Though papillons bear little resemblance to butterflies, these fluffy bundles of energy resemble the insect species more closely than they do real dogs. Papillions’ distinctive butterfly-like faces give way to expressive eyes and whiskers. And unlike butterfly wings, papillo­n fur doesn’t flutter in the wind. Instead, it remains still.

Papillons are energetic and curious creatures. They constantly explore their surroundings with curiosity, often leading them into trouble. Unfortunately, papillons can also get tangled up in things like electrical cords and fences. To prevent this problem, keep them away from wires and other potentially dangerous objects. Even though papillons are generally quiet dogs, they may bark loudly when they sense something suspicious nearby.

Luckily, they rarely cause harm to anyone except themselves when they attempt to free themselves from entanglements. Papillons usually weigh somewhere between 15 and 25 pounds and stand roughly 20 inches tall.

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